Neuroscience News

05/26/2014

Nine Scientific Pioneers Receive the 2014 Kavli Prizes

Laureates were selected for pioneering work in cosmic inflation,  nano-optics and brain networks for memory and cognition.

05/01/2014

Studies Identify Spinal Cord Neurons that Control Skilled Limb Movement

Researchers have identified two types of neurons that enable the spinal cord to control skilled forelimb movement.

04/17/2014

Why Your Nose Can Be a Pathfinder

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at NTNU recently discovered the process behind the phenomenon of smells and memories.

03/18/2014

Born with Border Patrol in our Brains

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology are taking a closer look at border cells and their role in our sense of place.

02/25/2014

Can Brain Scans Reveal How We Think?

Scientists debate whether such higher-order processes as consciousness and morality have their own real estate in the brain.

05/15/2013

UC San Diego Creates Center for Brain Activity Mapping

Responding to President Barack Obama’s “grand challenge” the University of California, San Diego has established the Center for Brain Activity Mapping (CBAM).

05/10/2013

THE BRAIN INITIATIVE

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative (BRAIN Initiative) is a broad, collaborative research initiative to advance the science and technologies needed to unlock the mysteries of the human brain.

04/01/2013

The Kavli Foundation Applauds President Obama’s All-Hands-on-Deck Call to Unlock Mysteries of Human Brain

The Kavli Foundation applauds President Obama's launch of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative.

03/29/2013

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2012 Kavli Prizes

President Barack Obama met in the Oval Office the six U.S. recipients of the 2012 Kavli Prizes.

03/05/2013

Flip of a Single Molecular Switch Makes an Old Brain Young

Yale School of Medicine researchers have reversed a process, recreating a youthful brain that facilitated both learning and healing in an adult mouse.

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